Months of street protests in Burundi have turned into regular armed attacksAFP
Months of street protests in Burundi have turned into regular armed attacks

The most important in this week’s headlines out of and concerning Africa, for those who need help catching up.

In this week’s news, Burundi takes center stage in discussions at the African Union, the U.S. Senate unanimously passes Electrify Africa Act.

  1. U.S. Senate Passes 2015 Electrify Africa Bill

The legislation which requires the president of the United States to create a comprehensive strategy for U.S. engagement with sub-Saharan Africa to develop a mix of “power solutions” to boost electricity access and reliability in the continent, is aimed at stimulating economic growth and access to education.

In a statement released by the Foreign Relations Committee, Marco Rubio, noted:

“The Electrify Africa Act will enhance our current assistance programs in Africa and help expand access to electricity, which is essential to support poverty reduction and promote economic development.”

2. Burundi Rejects Intervention from African Union

With increasing tension and concerns about instability and a repeat of the 1994 genocide, the African Union (AU) proposal for a 5,000 strong force known as the African Prevention and Protection Mission in Burundi has been rejected by the country’s government.

“An African Union official says the continental body and the rest of the international community will not sit by and watch the escalation of violence and human rights violations and abuses continue in Burundi,” writes James Butty from the Voice of America.

Burundi has seen an escalation of violence since current president, Pierre Nkurunzizi was re-elected for a third term after a constitutional amendment that allowed him to return to power.

Meanwhile in neighboring Rwanda, president Paul Kagame dangles the possibility of a third term, according to U.S. National Public Radio, NPR. The idea has received plenty of reaction from around the world, including reactions from the While House, urging Kagame to respect terms limits.